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Lu. Blog

Podcast - Jennifer E. Snyder

Lu. is excited to be featured on Jennifer E. Snyder’s blog as part of her Creating Your Own Path series.

“In the interview we chat about the evolution of Jenny's career path and why she still doesn't feel as though she's "made it." We also touch on how her fashion brand was built out of necessity, the avenues she's exploring to grow her business and how building a creative business is rarely a linear exercise.”

Take a listen! jf

See. Try. Buy. Lu. @ Art Walk

Join us this Thursday, May 7th, at Velouria in Seattle between 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. as we participate in the Pioneer Square First Thursday Art Walk. See and feel our current line, and even try stuff on.

If you can't make it, you can still be part of the action by joining Periscope's live stream from 6:30 p.m - 7 p.m. To watch, download the app and follow us on Twitter to be notified when we go live.

Dump Site

Jim @ Lu. HQ is going to Dump Site this weekend - looks pretty interesting!

Seattle Immersive Theatre does more than just put on shows. They create events around the audience, plunging them into a visceral experience that cannot be replicated in a conventional theatre. Through the use of real-world locations and entirely original scripts, the audiences are transported to a tangible piece of fantasy within their own world where their imaginations can be stimulated and challenged like never before.”

Colman Pool

mohai:

Group at Colman Pool for West Seattle Commercial Club Picnic, Seattle, July 27, 1947

Colman Pool and Bathhouse were built in 1941 with a grant from the Colman family, residents of the Fauntleroy district. The salt-water pool quickly became a popular meeting place for community organizations, who often held their annual picnics at Lincoln Park.

Photographer: Seattle Post-Intelligencer Staff Photographer

Image Date: July 27, 1947  Image Number: PI21620

I am so excited for Colman Pool to open up, especially after yesterday’s weather!

Louis Sullivan

seattleartmuseum:

Architect #LouisSullivan described the geometric design of circles and spheres in this elevator screen grillwork as a stylized interpretations of seeds—a fitting motif for the #Chicago Stock Exchange Building. “Elevator Screen from the Chicago Stock Exchange” by designer Louis Sullivan; manufacturer Winslow Brothers Company, ca. 1893–94.

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